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A better way to type…

Humans have been trying to invent a better way to type since the dawn of the typewriter. Four-finger, eight-finger, and, now, roll-over… According to BBC News a method employed by gamers — pressing a subsequent key before releasing another — will dramatically increase your typing speed (see article here). But experts question whether the method is worth learning. Likely, your “fast” fast enough.

Over the years I’ve watched my students type in many ways: hunt-and-peck, touch-touching (looking or not), one-finger, two-finger, etc. Certainly, how you type impacts how you think/communicate. When I was ready to begin my (short) career as a journalist, I consciously set out to learn touch typing. I wanted my ideas and words to flow unimpeded, and I mastered the art in one or two months.

One of my colleagues, who served as a typist in the Navy, can type and talk at the same time. It is an astonishing thing to view. I can do it briefly. (Generally, I’m finishing a thought that I intend to type while beginning a conversation — sometimes I’m just ignoring you, tossing in an “uh, huh” or “yeah” intermittently.)

Questions over the QWERTY arrangement persist, but nearly any arrangement will serve once it has been learned. The real question is if we can ever type as fast as we can think. How fast is a thought? And how are thoughts shaped by how we write? With a pen and paper, I can write all over the page, all over the text. On a typewriter, the thoughts flow in linier fashion. On a computer, backwards and forward (“backspace deletes”). Each thought is shaped by the process.

There is some speculation that voice-to-text will ultimately replace typing (the BBC News article posits 2022), and that is likely. Already, we use voice dictation for text messages (my colleagues exchange entire essays via text), and we navigate our “smart” homes via voice.

One day, perhaps, we will all be sitting in cafes talking to ourselves.

 

© 2018, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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Very senatorial…

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© 2018, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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Sermon notes

© 2018, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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Feeding your hunger for typewriter blogs

 Typewriter Blogs

I was recently informed that my blog was selected by Feedspot as one of the top 30 typewriter blogs. Indeed, thanks. I do not use any content reader myself, but I have noticed that a smattering of visitors have been directed here by Feedspot. Again, thanks.

That said, most of my readers find Type-Writer.org by search engine, and generally they are looking for a particular machine. (The Hermes Rocket/Baby and, oddly enough, the Royal Dart are popular search terms.) Otherwise, people land here by visiting the Typosphere.

As for Feedspot’s list of top 30 typewriter blogs, well, I can only observe that only 26 are listed, and a few of the most important blogs are missing. Ted Munk’s To Type, Shoot Straight, and Speak the Truth… is not listed (http://munk.org/typecast/). Nor is the Typewriter Database, which though is not presented as a blog seems to run off some blogging platform (this site is also maintained by Munk). These sites should certainly make the cut.

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© 2018, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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Good Friday

Composed on an Olivetti Lexikon 82 using a Pride 10 Smith Corona printing element. Manuscript above: First page of the autograph: Passio secundum Joannem.

Johannes Passion BWV 245 – Harnoncourt

Arvo Part – Passio

Evangelium passionis et mortis Domini (Gregorian Chant)

God bless on this Good Friday.

© 2018, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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