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A typewriter a minute

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Remington continued to manufacture “blind” typewriters through the first decade of the 20th century, despite increasing competition from Underwood and others. Still, the company remained dominant and its manufacturing process keenly interesting. Scientific American offered this inside view in 1905, highlighting the company’s output: one machine per minute.1

Previously, Scientific American offered a view of the factory in 1888, then using engravings, not photographs — see here.

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© 2019, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

  1. This post employs the font from the Remington Noiseless Typewriter. []
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Ephemera: Mrs. Utley’s typewriter

“I could not keep house without a HAMMOND Typewriter.” — Mrs. C.A. Utley, Syracuse, Nebraska, May 1, 1899 (73 years old)

The photo and text above do not appear to be an endorsement. Featured in the Stenographer, September 1899.

© 2019 – 2018, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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Emancipation for one, employment for others

From The Exponent, September 1, 1888 – a cartoon of a man typing; obviously not the author mentioned in this piece.

From The Exponent, March 15, 1886:

© 2019 – 2018, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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More on the House typewriter (no photo, though)

Previously, I wrote about the House typewriter (here), a machine that attracted much attention among stenographers in 1885, some suggesting the machine should be acquired and preserved. A photo was also circulating, but (seemingly) never published in any journal. Now, a further update:

The Phonographic World (New York), June 1886 —

© 2019, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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1894 in retrospect

Despite a slack economy in 1894, the typewriter industry was steadily growing. Stenographers increasingly were interested in new machines, especially as their profession scarcely distinguished between stenographer and typist. Both shorthand and typing were essential skills, and machines that we today are eager to collect, stenographers were eager to try: the Waverly, the Munson, the Hammond, the Franklin, and the Pneumatic Typewriter. These were optimistic times.

From The Phonetic Journal Jan. 5, 1895 —

© 2019 – 2018, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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