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“Gush” charged at time rates

From Illustrated Phonographic World, March 1895: “The funny papers have created an impression that many go into this business as a short cut to marriage. While, of course, that state is a possibility to all, the number that regard stenography as a means to that end is very small, and such an idea should be exploded.”

Full article:
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© 2019 – 2018, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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Unsuccessful typewriters (1895) – part two

From the Illustrated Phonographic World, March 1895 —


Information:

Boston Typewriter – The Virtual Typewriter Museum

© 2019 – 2018, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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The Era Typewriter (aka Bennington & Xcel)

The Era typed letters and entire words such as “the,” “and,” and “but” — but whether presets for common, two- and three-letter words was ever necessary is doubtful. Nonetheless, the idea attracted much attention.

Wesley H. Bennington filed a patent for his machine in 1901 (U.S. 762,272), but the application does not mention typing whole words. Eventually, working models would be named Bennington and Xcel (as seen at TypewriterDatabase.com). The Bennington never successfully launched, and advertisements emphasize stock offerings, not the actual machine.

The evolution of this typewriter — from Era to Bennington to Xcel — was chronicled in a variety of press reports:

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© 2019, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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Some unsuccessful typewriters (1895)

Failed typewriter companies and their machines draw considerable interest among collectors today. Often, only a few specimens of a given model are even known to exist. Thus, these machines are highly sought after.

Interest in unsuccessful typewriters began in the early days of the typewriter, as is evidenced by this article in the Illustrated Phonographic World, Jan. 1895 —

Additional information:

The Westphalia – Antikeychop
The Automatic – Antique Typewriter Collecting
The Rapid – Antikeychop (“Well, I love failed typewriters.”)
The Gardner – Richard Polt’s page

© 2019 – 2018, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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That was not part of business

From the National Stenographer, April 1893 —

© 2019 – 2018, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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