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The Caligraph vs. the Type-Writer

In the beginning, Remington and Caligraph battled for supremacy, and some journals employed “caligraph” and “type-writer” as common nouns. Ultimately, the case-shifting Remington would dominate, and the double-case Caligraph would become merely collectible. But in 1887, this was not yet the case.

From The Cosmopolitan Shorthander (Toronto), June 1887 –

© 2020 – 2019, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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Pretty typewriters, beware the “stolen kiss”

From The Western Stenographer (Kansas City), January 1894 –

© 2020 – 2019, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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Learn your DHIATENSORs?

Early in 1911, The Boston Globe published “A Twisted Alphabet” (see post here), in which the author championed changing the alphabet to the QWERTY arrangement of characters. Later, came the following:

From The Boston Globe, June 7, 1911 –

© 2020, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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A twisted alphabet

Forget your A-B-C’s, kid. From the Detroit Free Press, March 8, 1911 –

© 2020 – 2019, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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“Flood every joint with oil”

In a moment of frustration, submitted to The Cosmopolitan Shorthander (Toronto) for its May 1887 issue –

In our time, we might add: “Flood every joint with WD-40.”

© 2020, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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