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Early emoticons

An in-house advertisement for The Shorthand Review, January 1892, displays a very early set of emoticons:

What makes the emoticons above interesting is that they very obviously were produced on a typewriter… earlier emoticons seem to be the work of typographers.

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© 2019, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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Little Miss Lennie May Clifton

From The Phonetic Journal, July 1, 1891 —

Note: The image of the hotel dates to 1905.

© 2019 – 2018, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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The space bar

George Bernard Shaw, typing a Remington Portable Typewriter No. 1 – a very early version of the machine.

I was taught to employ only the right thumb, but in practice I find myself using both thumbs – though mostly the left. Of course, as I write this, I find that typing is like breathing: it gets awkward when you think about it. As George Bernard Shaw put it, “The unconscious self is the real genius. Your breathing goes wrong the moment your conscious self meddles with it.”1

From The Phonographic Magazine (Cincinnati), July 1, 1889 —

© 2019, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

  1. From Maxims for Revolutionaries, though as a trained vocalist, consciousness of breathing is quite a natural experience. []
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Typewriter, too long? Really?

From The Stenographer (Philadelphia), June 1892 —

Perhaps in reply to this.

© 2019 – 2018, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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Typewriter too long a word?

From The Phonetic Journal, July 9, 1892 —

Scorecard:

Typewriting (verb) – typing
Typewriter (machine) – typewriter, sometimes typer – I prefer type-writer
Typewriter (operator) – typist
Typewritten (adjective) – mostly typed, sometimes typewritten
Typewrite (verb) – type

© 2019 – 2018, Mark Adams. All rights reserved.

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